Heather Sorge

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About Heather Sorge

Prior to joining WEC, Heather worked as a paraprofessional in the Holland Township School district for over ten years, as well as an Organizational Development Consultant with the New Jersey Education Association. Sorge has been a strong advocate for New Jersey’s public schools specializing in anti-privatization efforts and campaign promotions. She was an active member of the Holland Township Education Association, Hunterdon County Education Association, and the New Jersey Education Association, serving as her local Legislative Action Team chair, Association Representative, and Grievance Team member in her district. She has presented at national and regional conferences, facilitating workshops supporting NJEA members professional development. Heather served as a regional lead in the NJEA Summer Fellows programs and is a proud graduate of the NJEA Apprentice Program. She is also an active member of the Holland Township Agriculture Committee. Sorge graduated from Churchman Business School with a degree in Accounting Finance.

Will N.J. have enough teachers to reopen schools? Union worried many won’t go back.

School districts have begun to hear from teachers who are requesting to retire early or refusing to return to the classroom during the coronavirus pandemic. Others are asking to teach only from home because they or one of their relatives have health problems. That is raising questions about whether there will be enough certified teachers to teach during the 2020-2021 school year under the state’s new rules limiting the number of students in each classroom, said Steve Beatty, secretary-treasurer of the New Jersey Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union. “That is a real question of whether or not we will physically have enough educators that will return ... That is a growing concern,” Beatty said. The NJEA was among nearly a dozen state and national groups that released a report Thursday, titled “A National Call to Action,” calling on public health agencies to help states come up with more detailed plans to protect students and teachers as schools prepare to reopen. Read More Here

By |2020-07-13T10:34:53-04:00July 13th, 2020|Highlights, WEC in the News|Comments Off on Will N.J. have enough teachers to reopen schools? Union worried many won’t go back.

Education Association demands immediate removal of toxic floors

NORTH PLAINFIELD-- The North Plainfield Education Association (NPEA) plans to turn out in force this Wednesday, May 13, at the District’s virtual mercury town hall meeting to urge the Board of Education to take immediate action.  Since 2018, the NPEA has been fighting for the removal of mercury-laden gym floors in two district schools. With the help of industrial hygienists from the Work Environment Council (WEC) and the New Jersey Education Association’s (NJEA) Healthy Schools Now network, the NPEA discovered the middle school gym floor had mercury levels high enough to require removal as hazardous waste.  Read more here.

By |2020-05-13T12:07:37-04:00May 13th, 2020|Highlights, WEC in the News|Comments Off on Education Association demands immediate removal of toxic floors

COVID-19: New Jersey’s education system is imperiled by the pandemic. Here’s how

According to a recent Gallup poll, 42% of parents worry about the impact COVID-19 will have on their children’s education. Despite the fact that New Jersey school districts are adapting and educators have gone above and beyond, altering lesson plans and creating virtual classrooms overnight, students have encountered difficulties learning in this current climate. In response, New Jersey lawmakers have developed a task force to follow the impact of education from COVID-19. There are a number of issues this pandemic has brought to the forefront that the task force should address to ensure all students are receiving an equitable education. New Jersey school districts first faced the challenge of providing computers to students in order to access online learning. While wealthier districts were able to fulfill this request, low- and moderate-income districts have struggled to supply this resource, further contributing to inequity in the classroom which already exists. Even once supplied, parents who lack computer knowledge have struggled to assist their children as they navigate new online learning programs. This, coupled with internet access and internet stability, has made distance learning a virtual nightmare for many families putting at-risk students at an even greater disadvantage. Read the full Opinion-Editorial in northjersey.com from Heather Sorge, HSN Campain Manager, WEC [...]

By |2020-05-07T13:34:31-04:00May 7th, 2020|Highlights, Opinion Pieces, WEC in the News|Comments Off on COVID-19: New Jersey’s education system is imperiled by the pandemic. Here’s how
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